Queen Elizabeth National Park: On the Wild side of Life!

On the 9th of October, 2020, Ntungo wildlife safaris Ltd set off for their trip to Queen Elizabeth National Park. After a very thorough planning process, this was a very exciting undertaking. At 7:30 AM, with everyone present at our assembly point, we set off for Fort Portal. We were a team of 11, led by our expert guide for the trip; Amos.  Many of us were friends from the past while others were acquaintances from the booking process. To keep out the silence, Amos drew from his expansive knowledge and kept us on the edge of our seats with tales of the Bachwezi and Nyinamwiru, until we reached our destination.

 

Tea plantation views on the way to Fort Portal

At Fort Portal, we had  lunch at the Capital One restaurant, and then set off for a hike to three crater lakes in the area. First, we visited the Amabere caves. According to Legend, this is where Bukuku the King cut off his daughter Nyinamwiru’s breasts after she refused to marry the man of his choosing. While here, we saw the stalagmites and stalactites and the buoyant Nyakasura falls. Our hike was capped with the extreme mud sledding adventure. The enthusiasts then walked onto the other side of the falls, where they paused for some beautiful photos. We proceeded to the rest of the hike where we saw the rest of the caves including the part where according to folk, Nyinamwiru kept her son Ndahura whom she conceived at after losing her breasts. And that sacred site where the Chwezi sat their meetings.

 

 

Later that day, we hiked to the top of Nyakasura hill. To appreciate the splendour of this vantage, one needs to reach this point in person. No explanation can do the view from up here any justice.  At this point, I can authoritatively tell you, that few of us made it to the top. Most that started the ascent, dropped out prematurely. Descending was a whole different challenge of its own. The slope was not only extremely steep, but the rocks along it kept giving way. It was a slippery affair, but we made it out safe nonetheless. We then made our way to Queen Elizabeth National Park.

At Queen Elizabeth national Park, not even the night could blanket the Medley of wonders that welcomed us. As we arrived at our lodge for the night, we saw a lone hippopotamus swaying about gracefully. The night was spent at the Kazinga wilderness Safari camp Ltd.

At first impression, the thought of sleeping while leopards lurked about in the cover of the night was daunting. Equally scary was the thought that In one sweep, a fully  tusked elephant could carry off the entire room structure. Many of us were distraught. We, however, got used to the environment and actually enjoyed the stay in the lodge.  What an experience! Their open roof bath place is a feature to look forward to.

 

Part of the team in Queen Elizabeth NP with Bunyampaka salt lake in the background

The Early morning game drive was yet another dramatic part of the tour. Instead of the wild splendour that we had come this far to catch, we found ourselves stashed in a lane of tracks of stuck cars. Thanks to the heavy downpour from the evening before. Our day was only rescued, when another guide driving  an extended land cruiser towed our vehicle out of the mud. On the ensuing drive, we encountered a wide range of fauna including a fully manned lion, buffaloes, elephants, lots of kob (the uganda Kob), waterbucks, and a number of colourful bird species. We made a stop at the Bunyampaka salt lake for a photo opp and some light shopping. After, we made our way back to the lodge for breakfast.

Due to an unfavorable turn in the weather, our itinerary was adjusted to match park conditions. The scheduled boat cruise was moved closer. To beat the forecasted afternoon rains, we set out to Katunguru stop, to embark on this our boat ride. upon arrival, we were welcomed by our guide John Bosco. on the ride, he told us the history of the park. Its size and what to expect while on the boat tour. Worthwhile is under statement. We saw lots of hippopotami. This park has the largest concentration of these in Africa. We saw lone buffaloes swimming at the shores, a crocodile and monitor lizards. The African fish eagles kept gazing at us. There were also lots of pied kingfishers, spur winged lapwings, water thicknees and so much more. In the middle of the channel, our boat came to  a stop. There were too many hoppos nearby. Fearing an attack, we unanimously agreed to return with the boat to the cock. We used the afternoon to rest and enjoy some time at the lodge.

Queen Elizabeth by night!
Some of the best moments we had on our trip. Laughter and cheer in the atmosphere!

In the evening, we joined the campfire for a party in the wild. We played UNO and the usual card games. UNO was a new game to most of us, however in no time, each team member was in on the thrill. Soon, the atmosphere was filled with sounds of music, cheering, and the card game calls of “warning, card, game.” I won’t go into details of the accusations and counter accusations about who had hidden which card. The card games were interrupted by a beef roasting siesta and then a drinking spree. We then danced deep into the night, unperturbed by the danger turked not far away by the dark of the night. We each retired late to our rooms, jovial and merry. The wild had called, and here we were, walking on the wildside of life! Having the time of our lives.

UNO in the wild

A special thank you to everyone who chose to travel with us on this fun adventure. We promise you more fun, and memorable experiences in the future.

 

To book your safari, contact us on info@ntungosafaris.com or check out our other itineraries www.ntungosafaris.com. We are also available on call +256 771 399299.

See you all soon.

Comments

November 13, 2020
Some really fantastic blog posts on this website , thanks for contribution. Farrand Engelbert Frey
Eva Luyiga
November 13, 2020
Thank you Farrand!

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